Doctor’s Kidnapping; Shellfish-Linked Deaths; CDC Lab Crackdown


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A Connecticut doctor’s reported kidnapping outside a New York City music venue ended with two men driving him back to work at Norwalk Hospital. (Fox News)

A Department of Justice spokesperson said the Biden administration will appeal the federal appeals court ruling on the abortion pill mifepristone (Mifeprex) to the U.S. Supreme Court. (Reuters)

A third person in the New York-Connecticut area died recently from flesh-eating Vibrio vulnificus infection, usually contracted by swimming in warm water and eating raw seafood. (New York Times)

Florida is warning of locally acquired dengue fever, which normally occurs in people returning from areas where the virus is widespread. (Newsweek)

A prisoner diagnosed with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia is on the run after escaping from the South Florida State Hospital in Pembroke Pines. (NBC Miami)

Viz.ai announced the FDA approval of its Viz HCM module, an artificial intelligence detection algorithm flagging hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which is integrated into the Viz.ai Platform.

CDC researchers named a specific strain of E. coli — associated with leafy greens — as re-occurring, emerging, or persistent (REP) strain REPEXH02.

Meanwhile, the CDC is trying to reform lab operations after design flaws and contamination stymied the development of its original COVID test. (CBS News)

The QuikTrip gas station company is expanding its foray into urgent care. (KFF Health News)

The social media platform formerly known as Twitter is hemorrhaging scientist accounts. (Nature)

Mobile ER doctor Reza Danesh, MD, is driving around Maui making house calls and giving away food and water. (NPR)

Researchers detailed a case of graft-versus-host disease in a new mother, triggered by fetal T cells transferred during the birth of her baby, who recovered quickly with glucocorticoid treatment alone. (New England Journal of Medicine)

Researchers are undertaking new research on how somatic mutations accumulate in a person’s genome over a lifetime. (Science)

Swedish men with higher cardiorespiratory fitness in youth tended to develop less head and neck, esophagus, stomach, pancreas, liver, colon, rectum, kidney and lung cancers decades later — but more prostate and malignant skin cancers. (British Journal of Sports Medicine)

An unlicensed woman accused or convicted of pretending to be a nurse for years in Canada and the U.S. faces yet more charges of assault, impersonation, and fraud. (CBC)

One company is building a projectile fusion reactor that may be used to produce medical isotopes such as Mo-99. (Physics World)

  • Nicole Lou is a reporter for MedPage Today, where she covers cardiology news and other developments in medicine. Follow





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